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Think Why? – 7 Feb 2021

3 COMMENTS

  1. Snowflakes are considered the most beautiful mathematical patterns in the world and that in a short while, it loses its shape and disappears without leaving any trace of its existence. Well, about the creator, we can’t really judge whether a creator exists behind the creation of each flake. When the water drop scatters as it falls and is frozen, a snow flake is born. Of course, there is a creator who created the water and the gravitational force that pulled it down.

    • It’s primarily caused by the molecular structure of water. Was the snowflake what was in mind of the designer when molecular covalence was designed? Or was the consequent dihedral symmetry of crystallization a pretty coincidence?

      Extra read for the real curious ones.
      https://www.storyofsnow.com/blog1.php/how-the-crystal-got-its-six

      On the other hand, if there are close to no two similar snowflakes (insanely low probability of similarly), then the fundamental design progression beyond the initial hexagonal plane has to be random, and it is to some extent random given how subjected it is to atmospheric conditions.

      And it turns out that among the quadrillion billions of snowflakes we get every year, a ton of them are infact ugly, which is natural when something is subjected to randomness. And consequently some are good looking which again is just another part of the super large spectrum of randomness we’re working with here.

      Here’s a sample of some snowflakes photos shot in freefall, which (unlike mainstream media) includes the ugly ones too. https://www.inscc.utah.edu/~tgarrett/Snowflakes/Gallery/

  2. It’s primarily caused by the molecular structure of water. Was the snowflake what was in mind of the designer when molecular covalence was designed? Or was the consequent dihedral symmetry of crystallization a pretty coincidence?

    Extra read for the real curious ones.
    https://www.storyofsnow.com/blog1.php/how-the-crystal-got-its-six

    On the other hand, if there are close to no two similar snowflakes (insanely low probability of similarly), then the fundamental design progression beyond the initial hexagonal plane has to be random, and it is to some extent random given how subjected it is to atmospheric conditions.

    And it turns out that among the quadrillion billions of snowflakes we get every year, a ton of them are infact ugly, which is natural when something is subjected to randomness. And consequently some are good looking which again is just another part of the super large spectrum of randomness we’re working with here.

    Here’s a sample of some snowflakes photos shot in freefall, which (unlike mainstream media) includes the ugly ones too. https://www.inscc.utah.edu/~tgarrett/Snowflakes/Gallery/

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